Baby boomer retirement

This one’s been on my mind for a while, but financial experts have been looking at this for years. Frontline has even done an entire program on it. What sort of plan my folks have is still on my list of “what to ask about” in the next couple of years and I hope I’m not too late on this.

Why worry? Well, it’s been a generality for me so far when news reports describe the looming baby-boomer retirement being a drag on those of us in the work world, but with my folks all within spitting range of retirement, it’s upon my family(s). And coming from a single-child, divorced household, I’ve been thinking a lot more about how to care for my parents and, incidentally, their spouses when there is only one of me. Not to mention, two of my three parents are somewhat self-employed, having their own businesses, and, consequently, no employer to match contributions to a potential 401k plan like I have.

After many years of just making it by on my own, I’m now finding that I have an income that goes beyond my own (and my wife’s) needs, so I’m considering finding a way to contribute toward retirement for my folks in their unique situation, to begin the Syssyphian task of saving with them. Thoughts and advice on how to start welcome…

One for the po-mo business world

I’m digging on Clay Shirky’s Here Comes Everybody: the Power of Organizing Without Organizations.  It’s outside my normal range of reading, but I’m interested in what he has to say on how “flat” organizations structures can actually come into fruition in today’s educational and/or Quaker environment (my spin on reading this).  I’m no business management person, but he’s definitely onto something with sections titled “Sharing Anchors Community” and “Everyone is a Media Outlet.”

It’s so interesting, I’m resisting the library’s recall notice (it’s on hold and I can’t renew it–gah!) until I’m finished with it.