Internet Archive visit

Internet Archive glass     I’ve been wanting to take a trip to visit a Friday lunch at the Internet Archive for years since I heard about them. If you haven’t heard of or used it, it might be a shock to learn about its existence–since 1996, they’ve been “capturing” the Internet onto permanent, indexed, searchable hard drives on behalf of the public. The Wayback Machine is probably the most famous arm of this project, and one that I use to reference works I wrote way back when I was a music journalist for the online-only publication, Buzznet.

A year and a half ago, they moved from their old digs in the Presidio to their new digs in the former Christian Scientist building on Funston (at Clement) and done some renovating (along with their logo which now features the Roman columns on the building). It’s a beautiful space, and one that fits many “wings” of the organization that they’ve branched into collecting–sound, video, and, along with Google, a book digitization project which includes open access and a lending library, called Open Library. They are even suggesting the MegaReader app for iPhone/iPad users to access the collection.

Digital desk

Digital desk

As part of the lunch, each person had to describe why they were visiting or, if you work there, interesting progress or events from your project you are working on.  I was visiting for several purposes with one being that my library receives unique items which are often Quaker-related and can be rare. I was particularly interested in seeing how their digitization works after realizing they have quite an amazing collection of Quaker documents already in their library for free viewing (482 as of this writing). One of the key findings, for me, is how this work is being done and shared as a research tool for Quakers, especially those not living near a library that would stock such items. Unfortunately, the cost is around $.10/page to have your document scanned, unless you donate the item to them, so this will most likely be cost-prohibitive at this point but it does bring hope that, should someone have a large bequest, they could probably pay for the scanning of many Quaker documents and have them housed, potentially, forever on open servers and open to the public. Better than a physical library in many ways!

I was particularly engaged by the Director of this project, Richard, who came from a commercial background and now works for this non-profit. He’s a great

Internet Archive server rack

A slice of the Internet

person to head this project as he definitely had a feel for why and how the Open Library will deal with the Googlization of everything in a non-commercial way.

The Open Library project is working toward offering books in many formats compatible with many e-readers out there, and have built their own web-reader which makes it available in this future-compatible format. And, since this past holiday season, it’s getting easier and easier to have access to e-readers. I’ve been an ebook fan/reader since back in 2000 when I started library school using my HP Journada 540 with a black-and-white screen.

While I’m not sure the Internet Archive will truly ever compete with the commercial world, it will continue its efforts to bring free books to the public in many formats and continue the fight for bringing books to people free of charge, so hooray for that. I’m happy to see that this is another answer for libraries as opposed to complicated DRM files and outsourcing to paid-vendors like OverDrive.

Secret readers

Remember when reading comics was considered uncouth by the literati.  Well, I do and I know that it wasn’t that long ago, and that it took Maus and Batman: the Dark Knight to bring the light of day to the rest of the world on comics as art that is now upon us.

a comic-strip biography

Louis Riel: a comic-strip biography

I bring this up after re-visiting Chester Brown‘s biography, Louis Riel, which absolutely blew me away a few years ago.  I was already a fan of I Never Liked You from years back (having discovered him via Drawn & Quarterly‘s Julie DoucetLouis Riel, the graphic novel, is actually a reprint of work he did back in the early 90’s, which makes it all the more impressive.  Thoroughly researched, deftly edited, and drawn with the sparse clarity of Japanese manga and condensed dialogue, Brown makes quick work of a folk hero from what is now Canada who is both lauded and unsung (and easily mentionable to any Canadian as a quick ‘in’ if you drop his name).

To bring this up, however, at a children’s book store with adults brought an unexpected surprise: we all shared in a love of graphic novels, secretly.  We’d never truly own it out loud (except via a blog, right?), but we all loved to talk about what really made us fans.  Was it the artwork of the incomparable Steve Ditko who inspired us to think in other dimensions about the reasons behind good and evil?  The mastermind of marketing of Stan Lee in our early years?  Or our affinity for the bleak altruism of Frank Miller?  An affinity for the sparse, beautiful ennui in Adrian Tomine’s youthful protagonists?  We loved them all under the “Graphic Novel” display one evening and wondered if anyone else in the room knew we’d found each other.

One for the po-mo business world

I’m digging on Clay Shirky’s Here Comes Everybody: the Power of Organizing Without Organizations.  It’s outside my normal range of reading, but I’m interested in what he has to say on how “flat” organizations structures can actually come into fruition in today’s educational and/or Quaker environment (my spin on reading this).  I’m no business management person, but he’s definitely onto something with sections titled “Sharing Anchors Community” and “Everyone is a Media Outlet.”

It’s so interesting, I’m resisting the library’s recall notice (it’s on hold and I can’t renew it–gah!) until I’m finished with it.

Born Standing Up

A Comic's Life Born Standing Up: A Comic’s Life by Steve Martin

My review


rating: 4 of 5 stars
Interesting snippets on the life and development of his style of comedy. I liked reading this with “Kiss Me Like a Stranger” in that he knew people during the same time as Gene Wilder, such as Gilda Radner and the SNL folks. It would probably be worth reading Gilda’s autobio after these two to gain more insight into an era of comedy that predates me.

View all my reviews.

CB “Library revival”

Library Revival! and Mind the Gap…

Last year, a Pew Internet & American Life Project report stated, “There are several major findings…one is this: For help with a variety of common problems, more people turn to the internet than consult experts or family members to provide information and resources. Another key insight is that members of Gen Y are the leading users of libraries for help solving problems and in more general patronage.” Whoa! Libraries aren’t dead, they’re just in revival! But the paper goes on to describe this young group as 18-24-year olds, rather than elementary or high school students. So what happens before then?

 

One of the joys of the early years during library time is when parents come and remark that “somehow he just started reading–overnight!” Like a light-switch, reading becomes important, and then all-consuming! Prying that Magic School Bus book out of their hands to put food in their mouths during dinner time is actually a challenge and, secretly, a joy to both the parent and the child. The joy lasts for three or four good years–the voracious series-reader, the comics-reader, the reference-reader, the in-depth subject-reader, the behemoth-volume reader, the genre-reader–all books seem to be part of the feeding-frenzy. Enjoyment and pleasure is a key component here, finding a book, magazine, comic, even trading cards or role-playing games help kids find out who they are, their likes and dislikes, their penchant for exploration. And as kids mature, reading as reward is a great part of our school–fifth graders begin their week by taking the first twenty minutes of class time with a self-chosen book for silent reading; classroom book clubs are exciting places to diversify the young readers’ repertoire; during silent reading time, students look around to see one another deeply engaged.

Yet in 2004, Reading at Risk, a report from the National Endowment of the Arts, claimed our nation of readers was in decline–“among every segment of the adult population reflects a general collapse in advanced literacy”–with the rate of decline for 18-24-year olds down by 55%. What are we to believe? What is reading–print or electronic? “literature,” newspapers, or cereal boxes? And, again, what about those early years, the “gap” where reading supposedly falls off, often when kids begin using multimedia?

 

 

One of the library program’s jobs is empowering kids to make good choices in their media, especially in the early years. How do I find something that is interesting and meaningful to me? How do I find something in such a large room full of materials? What do my friends like and how can we share these likes with each other? This is preparation for what lies ahead–the flood of information sources kids gain access to in the middle years–and a chance to give them guidance on how not to get lost in the ocean of resources we adults manage on a daily basis. Fifth graders are searching through public library databases to work on their historical newspapers. Many students have begun to do their own searches, use the self-checkout system alone, and return their books without visiting the library each week. The library becomes more of a backbone, something you call rely upon but maybe don’t think about too much until it’s not there. A sense of independence grows, but learning when you need to know more and how to find it becomes more significant.

 

As our library grows, we’ll begin to incorporate digital media tools for the middle school–a plasma screen, a photocopier, computers, databases for research geared toward younger students. Reading for information and research will become an acquired skill; learning keyword and phrase searching becomes an important skill to learn; recording and documenting your work well becomes more significant; deciding which sources to use and how to apply them is a complex set of decisions that is introduced and reinforced throughout these years as the Internet takes over print as the primary source of learning and information berry-picking. The Internet and the digital worlds become a larger part of the upper grades and a blending of the library’s physical and digital collections will begin to emerge.

 

So what can be done to keep kids reading print during these more scholarly “middle years”? Offer up some “hard” books dealing with tougher topics (Chris Crutcher, Judith Krug, and Carolyn Mackler are great authors for mature readers) and react to it with them; pick up a book you can read aloud together or listen together on CD/mp3; play role-playing games to keep your imagination running (Dungeons and Dragons is making a strong comeback!); visit the Guys Read website (www.guysread.com) for how to keep boys, in particular, reading; continue to take trips to the library for fun rather than “to do some research.” Try keeping a media diet balanced more heavily toward print with a variety of magazine subscriptions (very cheap these days), comics, board games, photography, or artwork; share your thoughts and ideas on what your media habits are like with the community on CommonSense Media’s website (www.commonsensemedia.org).

Remind your young ones that it takes time, patience, and perseverance to learn and engage with the world, not just a fast Internet connection or a large video collection. Print media is often a calming environment filled with imagination, wisdom, and depth that takes time to explore and discover which can be complimented by the web, television, or movies. Read that first 50 pages of a chapter book before deciding you don’t like it! Ask a friend for a recommendation, or share your reading lists online with your friends (check out LibraryThing [www.librarything.com] or GoodReads [www.goodreads.com]). And keep an eye on the clock–set time limits on interactive media (such as email, online gaming) or media that promotes stimulation (watching t.v.) rather than relaxation or creative media. The jump from print to digital and back requires you to help “mind the gap” as we board the train from the stationary platform or step off into a station to take a break.